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Audio Categories: Aircraft Weapons SFX

Weapon sound

M134 Minigun Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The M134 Minigun Sound is a sound of 7.62×51mm NATO six-barrel rotary machine gun with a high rate of fire (2,000 to 6,000 rounds per minute). It features a Gatling-style rotating barrel assembly with an external power source, normally an electric motor. Several branches of the U.S. military use M134 Minigun. United States Army use M134 and XM196, but the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy – GAU-2/A and GAU-17/A.

The “Mini” in the name is in comparison to designs that use a similar firing mechanism but larger shells, such as General Electric’s earlier 20-millimeter M61 Vulcan, and “gun” for a caliber size smaller than that of a cannon, typically 20 mm and higher.

The electric drive rotates the weapon within its housing, with a rotating firing pin assembly and rotary chamber. The minigun’s multi-barrel design helps prevent overheating, but also serves other functions. Multiple barrels allow for a greater capacity for a high firing rate, since the serial process of firing, extraction, and loading is taking place in all barrels simultaneously. Thus, as one barrel fires, two others are in different stages of shell extraction and another three are being loaded. The minigun is composed of multiple closed-bolt rifle barrels arranged in a circular housing. External power source, usually electric, pneumatic, or hydraulic rotate the barrels. Gas pressure or recoil energy of fired cartridges power other rotating-barrel cannons.

The machine gun sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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Weapon sound

M134 Rotate Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The M134 Rotate Sound is a sound of 7.62×51mm NATO six-barrel rotary machine gun with a high rate of fire (2,000 to 6,000 rounds per minute). It features a Gatling-style rotating barrel assembly with an external power source, normally an electric motor. Several branches of the U.S. military use M134 Minigun. United States Army use M134 and XM196, but the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy – GAU-2/A and GAU-17/A.

The “Mini” in the name is in comparison to designs that use a similar firing mechanism but larger shells, such as General Electric’s earlier 20-millimeter M61 Vulcan, and “gun” for a caliber size smaller than that of a cannon, typically 20 mm and higher.

The electric drive rotates the weapon within its housing, with a rotating firing pin assembly and rotary chamber. The minigun’s multi-barrel design helps prevent overheating, but also serves other functions. Multiple barrels allow for a greater capacity for a high firing rate, since the serial process of firing, extraction, and loading is taking place in all barrels simultaneously. Thus, as one barrel fires, two others are in different stages of shell extraction and another three are being loaded. The minigun is composed of multiple closed-bolt rifle barrels arranged in a circular housing. External power source, usually electric, pneumatic, or hydraulic rotate the barrels. Gas pressure or recoil energy of fired cartridges power other rotating-barrel cannons.

The M134 Rotate sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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Weapon sound

Minigun Cockpit Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The Minigun Cockpit Sound is a sound of 7.62×51mm NATO six-barrel rotary machine gun from the helicopter or airplane cockpit. For instance, helicopters Hughes OH-6 Cayuse and Bell OH-58 Kiowa, Bell AH-1 Cobra and UH-1 Iroquois use it. Likewise there are several airplanes with minigun – Cessna A-37 Dragonfly, Douglas A-1 Skyraider.

It features a Gatling-style rotating barrel assembly with an external power source, normally an electric motor. Several branches of the U.S. military use M134 Minigun. United States Army use M134 and XM196, but the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy – GAU-2/A and GAU-17/A.

The “Mini” in the name is in comparison to designs that use a similar firing mechanism but larger shells, such as General Electric’s earlier 20-millimeter M61 Vulcan, and “gun” for a caliber size smaller than that of a cannon, typically 20 mm and higher.

The electric drive rotates the weapon within its housing, with a rotating firing pin assembly and rotary chamber. The minigun’s multi-barrel design helps prevent overheating, but also serves other functions. Multiple barrels allow for a greater capacity for a high firing rate, since the serial process of firing, extraction, and loading is taking place in all barrels simultaneously. Thus, as one barrel fires, two others are in different stages of shell extraction and another three are being loaded. The minigun is composed of multiple closed-bolt rifle barrels arranged in a circular housing. External power source, usually electric, pneumatic, or hydraulic rotate the barrels. Gas pressure or recoil energy of fired cartridges power other rotating-barrel cannons.

The machine gun sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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Weapon sound

GSh23 Cockpit Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The GSh23 Cockpit Sound is a sound of a twin-barreled 23 mm Soviet Union autocannon firing from the airplane cockpit. Late-model MiG-21 fighters, all variants of the MiG-23, the SOKO J-22 Orao, the HAL Tejas and IAR 93 have this cannon. Likewise the tail turrets of the Tupolev Tu-22M bomber and some late-model Tu-95s. It entered service in 1965, replacing the earlier Nudelman-Rikhter NR-23 cannon.

The GSh-23 works on the Gast Gun principle developed by German engineer Karl Gast of the Vorwerk company in 1916. It is a twin-barreled weapon in which the firing action of one barrel operates the mechanism of the other. It provides a much faster rate of fire for lower mechanical wear than a single-barrel weapon. And it had the unusual ability to fire infrared flares and chaff rounds. Therefore it function as both a weapon and a dispenser of anti-missile countermeasures.

The GSh23 Cockpit sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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Weapon sound

GAU-8 Avenger Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The GAU-8 Avenger Sound is a sound of a 30 mm seven-barrel Gatling-style autocannon. The United States Air Force’s Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II typically mount it. Designed specifically for the anti-tank role, the Avenger delivers very powerful rounds at a high rate of fire. The Goalkeeper CIWS ship weapon system also use the GAU-8/A, which provides defense against short-range threats such as highly maneuverable missiles, aircraft, and fast maneuvering surface vessels.

The GAU-8/A is extremely accurate and can fire 4,200 rounds per minute without complications. The 30-mm shell has twice the range, half the time to target, and three times the mass of projectiles fired by guns mounted in comparable close air support aircraft.

The A-10 engines were initially susceptible to flameout when subjected to gases generated in the firing of the gun. When the GAU-8 is being fired, the smoke from the gun can make the engines stop, and this did occur during initial flight testing. Gun exhaust is essentially oxygen-free, and is certainly capable of causing flameouts of gas turbines. The A-10 engines now have a self-sustaining combustion section. When the gun is fired the igniters come on to reduce the possibility of a flameout.

The GAU-8 Avenger sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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Weapon sound

GAU-8 Cockpit Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The GAU-8 Cockpit Sound is a sound of a 30 mm seven-barrel Gatling-style autocannon firing from the A-10 Thunderbolt cockpit. Designed specifically for the anti-tank role, the Avenger delivers very powerful rounds at a high rate of fire. The Goalkeeper CIWS ship weapon system also use the GAU-8/A, which provides defense against short-range threats such as highly maneuverable missiles, aircraft, and fast maneuvering surface vessels.

The GAU-8/A is extremely accurate and can fire 4,200 rounds per minute without complications. The 30-mm shell has twice the range, half the time to target, and three times the mass of projectiles fired by guns mounted in comparable close air support aircraft.

The A-10 engines were initially susceptible to flameout when subjected to gases generated in the firing of the gun. When the GAU-8 is being fired, the smoke from the gun can make the engines stop, and this did occur during initial flight testing. Gun exhaust is essentially oxygen-free, and is certainly capable of causing flameouts of gas turbines. The A-10 engines now have a self-sustaining combustion section. When the gun is fired the igniters come on to reduce the possibility of a flameout.

The GAU-8 Cockpit sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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