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Audio Categories: Aircraft Weapons SFX

Weapon sound

M134 Minigun Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The M134 Minigun Sound is a sound of 7.62×51mm NATO six-barrel rotary machine gun with a high rate of fire (2,000 to 6,000 rounds per minute). It features a Gatling-style rotating barrel assembly with an external power source, normally an electric motor. Several branches of the U.S. military use M134 Minigun. United States Army use M134 and XM196, but the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy – GAU-2/A and GAU-17/A.

The “Mini” in the name is in comparison to designs that use a similar firing mechanism but larger shells, such as General Electric’s earlier 20-millimeter M61 Vulcan, and “gun” for a caliber size smaller than that of a cannon, typically 20 mm and higher.

The electric drive rotates the weapon within its housing, with a rotating firing pin assembly and rotary chamber. The minigun’s multi-barrel design helps prevent overheating, but also serves other functions. Multiple barrels allow for a greater capacity for a high firing rate, since the serial process of firing, extraction, and loading is taking place in all barrels simultaneously. Thus, as one barrel fires, two others are in different stages of shell extraction and another three are being loaded. The minigun is composed of multiple closed-bolt rifle barrels arranged in a circular housing. External power source, usually electric, pneumatic, or hydraulic rotate the barrels. Gas pressure or recoil energy of fired cartridges power other rotating-barrel cannons.

The machine gun sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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Weapon sound

M134 Rotate Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The M134 Rotate Sound is a sound of 7.62×51mm NATO six-barrel rotary machine gun with a high rate of fire (2,000 to 6,000 rounds per minute). It features a Gatling-style rotating barrel assembly with an external power source, normally an electric motor. Several branches of the U.S. military use M134 Minigun. United States Army use M134 and XM196, but the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy – GAU-2/A and GAU-17/A.

The “Mini” in the name is in comparison to designs that use a similar firing mechanism but larger shells, such as General Electric’s earlier 20-millimeter M61 Vulcan, and “gun” for a caliber size smaller than that of a cannon, typically 20 mm and higher.

The electric drive rotates the weapon within its housing, with a rotating firing pin assembly and rotary chamber. The minigun’s multi-barrel design helps prevent overheating, but also serves other functions. Multiple barrels allow for a greater capacity for a high firing rate, since the serial process of firing, extraction, and loading is taking place in all barrels simultaneously. Thus, as one barrel fires, two others are in different stages of shell extraction and another three are being loaded. The minigun is composed of multiple closed-bolt rifle barrels arranged in a circular housing. External power source, usually electric, pneumatic, or hydraulic rotate the barrels. Gas pressure or recoil energy of fired cartridges power other rotating-barrel cannons.

The M134 Rotate sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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Weapon sound

Minigun Cockpit Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The Minigun Cockpit Sound is a sound of 7.62×51mm NATO six-barrel rotary machine gun from the helicopter or airplane cockpit. For instance, helicopters Hughes OH-6 Cayuse and Bell OH-58 Kiowa, Bell AH-1 Cobra and UH-1 Iroquois use it. Likewise there are several airplanes with minigun – Cessna A-37 Dragonfly, Douglas A-1 Skyraider.

It features a Gatling-style rotating barrel assembly with an external power source, normally an electric motor. Several branches of the U.S. military use M134 Minigun. United States Army use M134 and XM196, but the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Navy – GAU-2/A and GAU-17/A.

The “Mini” in the name is in comparison to designs that use a similar firing mechanism but larger shells, such as General Electric’s earlier 20-millimeter M61 Vulcan, and “gun” for a caliber size smaller than that of a cannon, typically 20 mm and higher.

The electric drive rotates the weapon within its housing, with a rotating firing pin assembly and rotary chamber. The minigun’s multi-barrel design helps prevent overheating, but also serves other functions. Multiple barrels allow for a greater capacity for a high firing rate, since the serial process of firing, extraction, and loading is taking place in all barrels simultaneously. Thus, as one barrel fires, two others are in different stages of shell extraction and another three are being loaded. The minigun is composed of multiple closed-bolt rifle barrels arranged in a circular housing. External power source, usually electric, pneumatic, or hydraulic rotate the barrels. Gas pressure or recoil energy of fired cartridges power other rotating-barrel cannons.

The machine gun sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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Weapon sound

M39 Cannon Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The M39 Sound is a sound of a firing 20 mm caliber single-barreled revolver cannon. Many of fighter aircraft used it from the early 1950s through the 1980s.

The Springfield Armory developed M39, based on the World War II–era design of the German Mauser MG 213. That was a 20 mm (and 30 mm) cannon, which did not see combat use.

The M39 Cannon is a standard armament of the F-86H fighter-bomber, F-100 Super Sabre, F-101A and F-101C Voodoo, and the F-5 Freedom Fighter. The B-57B tactical bomber was also use it. The only US aircraft still flying with the M39 is the Northrop F-5. Extensive work had to be done on the forcing cone, heat dissipation, cook-off prevention, link testing, and reinforcement, to raise the mean time between failures to 1-in-1000 rounds fired.

The M39 served as the basis for the T75 autocannon developed by the Republic of China (Taiwan). It was a more-powerful partial replacement for the M2HB machine gun onboard naval vessels and the HMMWV tactical vehicle, with its latest use being within the XTR-101 and XTR-102 weapon stations.

The M39 Cannon Sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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Weapon sound

M39 Cockpit Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The M39 Cockpit Sound is a sound of a firing 20 mm cannon firing from the Northrop F-5 Fighter cockpit. Many of fighter aircraft used it from the early 1950s through the 1980s.

The Springfield Armory developed M39, based on the World War II–era design of the German Mauser MG 213. That was a 20 mm (and 30 mm) cannon, which did not see combat use.

The M39 Cannon is a standard armament of the F-86H fighter-bomber, F-100 Super Sabre, F-101A and F-101C Voodoo, and the F-5 Freedom Fighter. The B-57B tactical bomber was also use it. The only US aircraft still flying with the M39 is the Northrop F-5. Extensive work had to be done on the forcing cone, heat dissipation, cook-off prevention, link testing, and reinforcement, to raise the mean time between failures to 1-in-1000 rounds fired.

The M39 served as the basis for the T75 autocannon developed by the Republic of China (Taiwan). It was a more-powerful partial replacement for the M2HB machine gun onboard naval vessels and the HMMWV tactical vehicle, with its latest use being within the XTR-101 and XTR-102 weapon stations.

The M39 Cockpit Sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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Weapon sound

M61 Vulcan Sound – Aircraft Weapons SFX Library

The M61 Vulcan Sound is a sound of General Electric (currently General Dynamics) gatling-style rotary cannon. It fires 20 mm rounds at an extremely high rate (typically 6,000 rounds per minute). The M61 and its derivatives have been the principal cannon armament of United States for fifty years.

The United States Air Force’s F-14 Tomcat, F-15 Eagle, F-16 Fighting Falcon and F/A-18 Hornet typically mount it. Also the M61 is the basis of the US Navy Mk 15 Phalanx Close-in weapon system and the M163 VADS Vulcan Air Defense System.

Each of the cannon’s six barrels fires once in turn during each revolution of the barrel cluster. The multiple barrels provide both a very high rate of fire (around 100 rounds per second). And contribute to prolonged weapon life by minimizing barrel erosion and heat generation. Most aircraft versions of the M61 are hydraulically driven and electrically primed. A hydraulic drive motor through a system of flexible drive shafts rotate the gun rotor, barrel assembly and ammunition feed system.

The M61 Vulcan sound consists of the firing start sound – [START] file, [LOOP] audio file 10 seconds long and the ending file – [END], which should be played at the end of the shooting. The Aircraft Weapons SFX Library includes 51 audio files.

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